One last interview: Twenty Someone Robin Beck

Tysomeones:  Robin, the time has come.

Me: Must you be so cryptic and dramatic?

Tysomeones: Robin, your blog is over.

Me: That’s rude don’t you think?

Tysomeones: Who’s interviewing who?

Me: Well, we’re the same person.

Tysomeones:  This is so meta.

Me: So meta.

Tysomeones: Are you sad the blog is over?

Me: It is the best of times, it is the worst of times.

Tysomeones: Who’s dramatic now?

Me: Are we going to argue or are you going to ask questions?

Tysomeones: You said the goal was to highlight great people doing great things. Do you think you accomplished that?

Me: I do. I think everyone I interviewed is making a mark on the world. They were all inspiring, kind, vibrant, encouraging and fearless.

Tysomeones: Do you have any regrets?

Me: Yea, you remember in Miami that night when I-

Tysomeones: About the blog. The blog!

Me: Nice save. Oh sure! I never understood why regret was such a dirty word. Everyone is afraid to say they have them. I have a few with the blog.  One time someone told me, “I wish my job was cool enough to be featured.” I knew then I had sent the wrong message. The blog was supposed to be highlighting great people, not necessarily people who had the “greatest” jobs. If they did, that was a bonus, but I didn’t want that to be the requirement or the lead.

Being a good person was the prerequisite and the cool jobs followed. I probably took a detour along the way and could have revisited my slogan. It was “great people doing great things”, not “great people doing great jobs.” It makes sense that they had awesome jobs though right? If you are someone who lives life to the fullest then I believe you are strategic about how you spend your time and the majority of our time is spent at work.

Tysomeones: You said a few regrets?

Me: Right. There are people I didn’t get a chance to feature who I want the world [my readers] to know about! I also wish I would have done all ages. It would have added perspective and diversity. I would have liked to compare the interviews.

Tysomeones: Compare how?

Me: Compare the things people wanted in ten years and their jobs too. Those were the two constant questions and the responses may have varied with age.

I noticed a trend in all the responses. When I said describe your job in three words, the majority of twentysomeones said rewarding. I wonder if someone older would respond the same way. In ten years, twenty someones spoke of getting/being married. What would the older crowd want from life? I’ll never get to explore that in this space.

I also wish I would have had 11 questions. The last would be, “Who should I interview next?” I could have reached more people that way and it would’ve been cool to see who the interviewees admire.

Tysomeones: I’m dying to know. Who was your favorite tysomeone?

Me: That’s like choosing between children!

Tysomeones: No it’s not.

Me: Yea it’s not at all. I just wanted that to feel heavier. Let’s see…my favorite…they were all so fun!  I will say Ahmed Ahmed came with a force I hadn’t felt. A lot of people asked, “What should I say?” “Does that sound alright?” “Will you edit this?” Ahmed had this ready when you are attitude. I’ve been told you can tell you are in the presence of someone powerful because they make you feel that you, too, are powerful. That’s really how I felt with him. He was also conscious of time. I appreciated that.

Tysomeones: Conscious of time?

Me: Conscious of making time rather. He made it a priority. It’s not like this was Time or Vanity Fair, but I appreciated it when people made time. Time is a trigger for me.

Tysomeones: Trigger?

Me: It’s the greatest currency. When people say “I don’t have time” or “I’m busy” it tells me something. I’ve never met a person too busy to do what they want. It’s fine if someone didn’t want to be on the blog, but time is a poor excuse. Alia El-Sawi works to stop human trafficking, Justin Gaymon was training for the Olympics, Kidist Allen-Gessesse was in the Peace Corps speaking to me in an internet café. No hard feelings, just telling that’s all.

Tysomeones: If there are so many great people out there then why are you stopping?

Me: It’s been three years and I want and need to pursue other projects.

Tysomeones: Like what?

Me: I’m working on a coming of age novel that I want to finish this year and I’m perpetually writing children’s books and my autobiography.

The autobiography is something for my children. It’s called “Beck, Party of Three.” It’s what my mom always said when we were going out to eat, but party is a great homonym. It’s a small group, but also a celebration. Fitting for my family I think.

Tysomeones: Why not wait until you’re older?

Me: Memory distorts the truth. I want to write my life as I live it, not as I remember it.

Tysomeones: And the other books?

Me: I wrote a children’s book for my goddaughter, Bella. It is about a turtle who wants to hop like his friends the frog, bunny and kangaroo. I love personifying animals. I made a twitter handle for a rat once. My friends were concerned.

I also enjoy writing children’s stories with black protagonists doing regular things. Not set in the 60’s, not during slavery, just black kids doing regular things. Not as the sidekick either. The protagonist!

Tysomeones: So that’s your passion?

Me: One of them. It’s my passion as millennials say, my responsibility as my elders would say, and my calling if you talk like Oprah.

Tysomeones: Will you blog again?

Me: Sure, I’ll have another blog about my family one day. It’ll be about our every day life. Dera White has an amazing blog about her family. I can only hope to be doing something similar one day. It’s raw. Seemingly unfiltered. Hilarious. Most importantly, you can tell how much she adores her husband and children.

Tysomeones: I’d be remiss if I didn’t ask. In ten years you will be…

Me:  I’m going to steal Nick Hamlett’s answer. If you remember, he said a feeling and not something concrete. At the time I thought his answer was somewhat lazy. Everyone else talked about living in a particular city, having a specific job, being married, etc. He said he’d be in love with life. I actually like that because his journey doesn’t have to look a certain way. It has no boundaries.

I vibe more with feelings than benchmarks. Ten years ago my job today didn’t even exist. I could be doing something in my future that has yet to be created. Who knows! They say the way to make God laugh is to talk about your plans.

Tysomeones: I see.

Me: But there is one thing I want to plan! Let me not speak too soon.

Tysomeones: What’s that?

Me: I want to have a “Where are they now?” dinner party. I want every tysomeone and every tysomeone supporter in one room. Mark my words, it’s happening.

Tysomeones: I’m a blog. All I do is mark words.

Me: It’s an expression.

Tysomeones: I see. Anything else you’d like to add?

Me: I don’t want to sound like I’m getting a golden globe (I kinda do want to sound like that), but I want to take this time to thank everyone who read the blog. The texts, emails and calls really made me feel like Pharrell Williams filming Happy. The blog was only as strong as the readers and I am grateful for you all.

I also want to thank my mom for being biased in my favor when it comes to my writing, my sister for giving me sports questions and reading my work when she’d rather be at happy hour, my aunt for always, always commenting and my granny for asking me, “Now, what is a blog?”

Tysomeones: And I want to thank you for creating me.

Me: The pleasure was all mine.

*My email is beckerobin@gmail.com. If you see someone doing something awesome or if YOU are doing something awesome then feel free to share. The blog is ending, but I’m not going anywhere!

“Do your little bit of good where you are; it’s those little bits of good put together that overwhelm the world.” ― Desmond Tutu

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3 thoughts on “One last interview: Twenty Someone Robin Beck

  1. That was a great post Robin! I enjoyed reading it. You had a great goal in mind with your blog and I think you accomplished it! Can’t wait to see what you write next!

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